Gold vs IRL Money

sunflower013

Sodbuster
What do you guys think g (in SDV) is equal to in IRL money? I always thought 1g=$0.1, because obviously seeds would not cost $80, I would say more around $8, even though that’s a little low. However, I do think the house upgrades are priced in a different way, because it’s closer to what you would actually pay to get your house upgraded. Anyway, what do you guys think and why? Feel free to use any IRL currency as a contrasting factor!
 
What do you guys think g (in SDV) is equal to in IRL money? I always thought 1g=$0.1, because obviously seeds would not cost $80, I would say more around $8, even though that’s a little low. However, I do think the house upgrades are priced in a different way, because it’s closer to what you would actually pay to get your house upgraded. Anyway, what do you guys think and why? Feel free to use any IRL currency as a contrasting factor!
Are we basing this on the US Dollar only? Or other currency through out the world?
 

tdog0008

Greenhorn
So I originally assumed that Morris was offering Pierre minimum wage, and assumed that minimum wage was the same as the US, and came up with a figure of 1g=$1.45

However, seeing as a chicken costs 800g, and you can get a chicken from Tractor Supply for $3, it seems that the exchange rate would be $1 USD= 266.67g.

Which means that Morris was offering Pierre roughly 2¢ per hour.

Or maybe prices in Stardew Valley are just wack.
 

Potatoes

Planter
It’s always so weird to think about things like this. I remember reading something once that the money in the Pokémon games wasn’t worth much, so someone that was actually around 10 years old would be able to afford pokéballs and potions and stuff like that to start their journey. To me money is such an abstract concept, like here’s a piece of paper that’s worth x amount of dollars, and if you work so many hours you get so many pieces of paper (and now that so much is digital banking it’s even more abstract).

It seems like the economy is pretty good in Stardew Valley, even with Joja Mart in town Pierre is able to keep his shop open, and even though you only start off with 500G you’re able to use that to start your farm and make a living, I’m not sure how much it costs to live in Zulu City though. It seems like to worth of G is much less that the American dollar anyway.

@tdog0008 I would also not be surprised if Morris only offered Pierre 2cents an hour, that seems like the Joja way!
 
It’s always so weird to think about things like this. I remember reading something once that the money in the Pokémon games wasn’t worth much, so someone that was actually around 10 years old would be able to afford pokéballs and potions and stuff like that to start their journey. To me money is such an abstract concept, like here’s a piece of paper that’s worth x amount of dollars, and if you work so many hours you get so many pieces of paper (and now that so much is digital banking it’s even more abstract).

It seems like the economy is pretty good in Stardew Valley, even with Joja Mart in town Pierre is able to keep his shop open, and even though you only start off with 500G you’re able to use that to start your farm and make a living, I’m not sure how much it costs to live in Zulu City though. It seems like to worth of G is much less that the American dollar anyway.

@tdog0008 I would also not be surprised if Morris only offered Pierre 2cents an hour, that seems like the Joja way!
That is why you must chose the junimo way
 
What do you guys think g (in SDV) is equal to in IRL money? I always thought 1g=$0.1, because obviously seeds would not cost $80, I would say more around $8, even though that’s a little low. However, I do think the house upgrades are priced in a different way, because it’s closer to what you would actually pay to get your house upgraded. Anyway, what do you guys think and why? Feel free to use any IRL currency as a contrasting factor!
You've got backpacks for 10,000 gold. This is outer space currency for sure.
 

27dschild

Sodbuster
So I originally assumed that Morris was offering Pierre minimum wage, and assumed that minimum wage was the same as the US, and came up with a figure of 1g=$1.45

However, seeing as a chicken costs 800g, and you can get a chicken from Tractor Supply for $3, it seems that the exchange rate would be $1 USD= 266.67g.

Which means that Morris was offering Pierre roughly 2¢ per hour.

Or maybe prices in Stardew Valley are just wack.
Well you get 500g for working at joja for years, joja pays illegal amounts probably
 
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tdog0008

Greenhorn
It’s always so weird to think about things like this. I remember reading something once that the money in the Pokémon games wasn’t worth much, so someone that was actually around 10 years old would be able to afford pokéballs and potions and stuff like that to start their journey. To me money is such an abstract concept, like here’s a piece of paper that’s worth x amount of dollars, and if you work so many hours you get so many pieces of paper (and now that so much is digital banking it’s even more abstract).
I remember getting a bit older and realizing that prices in Pokémon made a lot more sense in Japanese yen than in US dollars. My mind was blown.
 

Sigrah

Sodbuster
What do you guys think g (in SDV) is equal to in IRL money? I always thought 1g=$0.1, because obviously seeds would not cost $80, I would say more around $8, even though that’s a little low. However, I do think the house upgrades are priced in a different way, because it’s closer to what you would actually pay to get your house upgraded. Anyway, what do you guys think and why? Feel free to use any IRL currency as a contrasting factor!
I don’t think Stardew prices match anything in real currency. There’s just too much variance in goods to make sense. For example, a gold bar can be sold for 250g (making it likely worth 500g), but then a chicken costs 800g? And a cup of coffee at the saloon costs 300g?

It just doesn’t make sense to me. The only way it could is if the supply and demand in Stardew is way different than in real life. What that is, who knows.
 
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